I recently got myself a PicoZed 7Z030 SoM (system-on-module) so that I could start developing more resource intensive applications for the Ethernet FMC, such as network tapping and network latency measurement. Why would I use a SoM for this? Checkout my comparison of Zynq SoMs to learn more about the benefits of SoMs in product development.

It’s worth mentioning this arrived the day after I ordered it. Here are some photos I took while unboxing:

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Packing slip and PicoZed in an anti-static bag.

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The MicroZed has its own custom product packaging so I was surprised by this plain white box – but I would have thrown it away anyway!

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Here’s the slick looking red PCB with the recognizable Zynq 7Z030 in the middle. I particularly wanted the 7Z030 because it has a lot of LUTs and it’s also the only PicoZed with MGTs (multi-gigabit transceivers).

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The other side of the PCB has 3 expansion connectors providing access to 148 I/Os and 4 GTX (gigabit transceivers).

You can expect to see more PicoZed projects from me over the next few months!

Jeff is passionate about FPGAs, SoCs and high-performance computing, and has been writing the FPGA Developer blog since 2008. As the owner of Opsero, he leads a small team of FPGA all-stars providing start-ups and tech companies with FPGA design capability that they can call on when needed.

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